Archive for the 'Environmental Issues' Category

22
Jul
08

the smart mob

I have just been sitting in the Student HIV/AIDS Resistance Campaign (SHARC) committee meeting, and this got me thinking about some issues surrounding mobile media, and how it really can make a difference to our society. At every SHARC march, or at every event, there are the same people that go to every activism event. There needs to be a new way to reach a broader audience, to inspire people and to get them to act.

Mobile media has a bad name, in terms of being seen to simply circulate junk and useless information, or information that can simply be found on the Internet or in a newspaper. But what about the potential that lies within mobile media to change the way that mass action or protesting is organised? Let’s have a look at the smart mob, a term coined by Howard Rheingold.

The smart mob or the mobile ad hoc social network, describes the:

new social form made possible by the combination of computation, communication, reputation and location awareness (Rheingold 2000).

Smart mobs are behaving intellectually, something which is not generally associated with the ‘mob mentality,’ and are using new technologies and social networking, to further their cause. One of the ways in which smart mobs organise themselves is through mobile devices, and thus we are approaching a new era, one of mobile activism.

Mobile activism refers to the use of mobile devices by different organisations (often non-profit) to organise, mobilise, motivate and inspire people to act accordingly.

One of the first reported use of cell phones in a mass demonstration took place during the World Trade Organisation meeting in Seattle in 1999. Cell phones were used to co-ordinate and mobilise activists, making the process quicker and less controllable by officials.

One example that Rheingold (2001) uses in his book “Smart Mobs: The Next Social Revolution” is the fall of President Joseph Estrada of the Philippines. In 2001 President Joseph Estrada was the first head of state to lose power to a smart mob. More than 1 million residents gathered over the four day protest in a response to a message sent out that simply said: “Go 2EDSA. Wear blck.”

This was not the first incident of mobile activism and the smart mob, and it will not be the last. Mobile activism and smart mobs have influenced a range of protests and mass organisations, ranging from various NGO causes, environmental issues, to politics and rising petrol prices.

Using cell phones to organise mass action bypasses the mass media as a source of information, thus making it less controllable by officials. The process of communication is also made quicker, and faster, as activists can communicate while on the move. Evidence of the protesting can also be told to others, through footage caught on a cell phone, like video, photographs or audio.

The implications for social change are incredible. Organising mass action becomes something easy, something quick, something that guarantees that the message gets out and that the action occurs. Mobile activism can bring about a new type of social change, something that can hopefully change the apathetic nature of the younger generations in South Africa.

05
May
08

Let’s not be e-wasteful

At the age of 21 years I have used approximately six mobile phones. I have lost one, one was broken and thrown away after being put through the washing machine, one was lent to a friend and stolen, two sit in my drawer at home and one is currently resides in my handbag.

Mobile waste has become a rising concern among many environmentalists as it is the fastest growing source of urban pollution. As as form of e-waste, mobiles that are not properly disposed of can have serious toxic environmental and health consequences due to the amount of lead, mercury and cadmium in electronic devices.

Chemicals and toxins from e-waste are known to lead to serious health problems like reproductive failures, deformities, thyroid malfunctions, immune suppression and behavioural abnormalities.

Not only do mobile phones have toxic parts, but they also have a very short life span – often discarded (or handed down) when cell phone contracts are renewed once every two years.

The problem is introduced when the electronic devices are dumped in landfills, or are shipped off to developing countries that have lower environmental standards so that the waste can be processed. Currently electronic waste represents two percent of America’s trash in landfills, and equals 70 percent of overall toxic waste. It is estimated that America alone exports 80 percent of its e-waste to China, India and Pakistan.

E-waste is becoming more of a problem in Africa. Nigeria is fast becoming one of the most popular countries in the world to dump e-waste. Children sift through the e-waste, the poor burn it for fuel and groundwater is becoming contaminated by landfills filled with electronic waste.

The good news is that Nokia is helping to combat the problem by setting up waste dumping centres across East Africa to reprocess old mobile phone waste, including batteries. Nokia will collect mobile phone waste for recycling and repairs as part of its environmental policy of reducing emissions of electronic waste.

So instead of leaving all those cell phones in your drawer at home, or throwing them away, why not take your old phone to a collection point for safe recycling, for a cleaner and safer environment for us all. 

To read more about how the web is trying to go green check out Qudsiya Karrim’s post on the Social Media blog!