Posts Tagged ‘nokia

11
May
08

mobile cuts out the middle man

Online video is big, and video on your phone is going to be bigger. You have your phone on you at all times and so you can watch whatever video you want to, whenever you want to.

Youtube has announced that it will be offer access to their videos through mobile devices. Liv.tv was launched in July 2007 to allow users to view and ahre videos on their cell phones. Adobe released Flash Lite 3, a program that enables cell phone makers to provide customers with a complete web browsing experience off their phones, including videos.

The possibilities for mobile video publishing by journalists, whether citizen journalists or professional journalists are also burgeoning. Anyone can create a video using their cell phone, and uploading your content onto a website is also relatively easy.

Breaking news can be recorded on your mobile phone, uploaded and watched on a video sharing space, like Youtube or syndicated to a news website. It’s simple, easy and it cuts out the middle man. No longer are audiences given material that has been edited and checked over by sub-editors, editors and various other gatekeepers. It allows audiences to see what is actually going on, with little mediation.  

In Myanmar, Burma, the internet and mobile phones have played an important part in getting information out of the country since the government began restricting visas to journalists. A slew of Burma blogs and live footage, caught with mobile phones have been published to inform the public about the crisis.

After large fires in California, many news organisations used user generated content that was captured on mobile devices for their live footage. Media benefited byhaving mroe people on the ground. More eyes to see what is going on. And more footage to use.

Big media companies like Reuters have started to harness the potential that mobile media has to offer, collaborating on a project with Nokia called Reuters Mobile Journalism. The Nokia N95 will be packaged with a tripod, keyboard and solar charger, as a built-in camera and video recorder.

While this technology is initially aimed at journalists, the potential for citizens to exploit this is slowly developing.

How mobile media will change the role of professional journalism and facilitate greater citizen reporting remains to be seen.

To check out an example of mobile reporting check out Voices of Africa.

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05
May
08

Let’s not be e-wasteful

At the age of 21 years I have used approximately six mobile phones. I have lost one, one was broken and thrown away after being put through the washing machine, one was lent to a friend and stolen, two sit in my drawer at home and one is currently resides in my handbag.

Mobile waste has become a rising concern among many environmentalists as it is the fastest growing source of urban pollution. As as form of e-waste, mobiles that are not properly disposed of can have serious toxic environmental and health consequences due to the amount of lead, mercury and cadmium in electronic devices.

Chemicals and toxins from e-waste are known to lead to serious health problems like reproductive failures, deformities, thyroid malfunctions, immune suppression and behavioural abnormalities.

Not only do mobile phones have toxic parts, but they also have a very short life span – often discarded (or handed down) when cell phone contracts are renewed once every two years.

The problem is introduced when the electronic devices are dumped in landfills, or are shipped off to developing countries that have lower environmental standards so that the waste can be processed. Currently electronic waste represents two percent of America’s trash in landfills, and equals 70 percent of overall toxic waste. It is estimated that America alone exports 80 percent of its e-waste to China, India and Pakistan.

E-waste is becoming more of a problem in Africa. Nigeria is fast becoming one of the most popular countries in the world to dump e-waste. Children sift through the e-waste, the poor burn it for fuel and groundwater is becoming contaminated by landfills filled with electronic waste.

The good news is that Nokia is helping to combat the problem by setting up waste dumping centres across East Africa to reprocess old mobile phone waste, including batteries. Nokia will collect mobile phone waste for recycling and repairs as part of its environmental policy of reducing emissions of electronic waste.

So instead of leaving all those cell phones in your drawer at home, or throwing them away, why not take your old phone to a collection point for safe recycling, for a cleaner and safer environment for us all. 

To read more about how the web is trying to go green check out Qudsiya Karrim’s post on the Social Media blog!